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China

China

An alluring land on the top of every traveler's must-see list, China boasts a rich and textured history that spans over 5,000 years.  From the Great Wall in Beijing to the modern delights of Shanghai and Hong Kong, China's essence lies in its diversity.  With Ritz Tours as your guide, you will discover the hidden gems of ancient villages, poetic landscapes, and the charm of the local people all on one vacation.  Beyond China s major cities, there are also opportunities for the more adventurous at heart -- a journey along the legendary Silk Road or a visit to the mysterious land of Tibet.

SELECT A VACATION SERIES:

China Premiere Series
China Deluxe Series
City Packages

PREMIERE SERIES

Best Quality in Travel

What Makes Our Experience Different?
Our Premiere Series is the epitome of quality luxury escorted travel that very few can emulate. You can say that we have set the gold standard in tour magnificence that includes many individual attention to details and comforts, such as small group size, personable travel and ground arrangements, upgrades to executive or club floors in the best handpicked hotels, executive room accommodation onboard cruises, best accompanying English-speaking local guides and tour managers, private room dining in some of the best local restaurants throughout, visits to unique attractions, and more!

Distinctive Features & Inclusions in China

v Experienced tour manager is automatically included throughout your journey for great personal service and a peace of mind when group has minimum 6 persons

v Exclusive and attentive arrangements of small group size with maximum 20 persons only

v Greatest comforts and luxury with upgraded accommodation to executive or club floors at the best 5-star hotels in each city and onboard Yangtze River cruise

v  Exclusive cocktail and happy hours at hotels

v Travel Guard insurance is included with full cancellation coverage (up to$300 value) if full payment is received 60 days prior to departure

v Knowledgeable English-speaking city guides to pamper your needs

v Tips for local city guides, drivers, and porters already included

v Personalized handcrafted stamp seal with each guest’s Chinese name in Beijing

v Exclusive individual photograph taken in front of the excavation pit at the Museum of Terracotta and Horses in Xian

v Private room dining at local restaurants as per itinerary

v Optional “My Own Room” arrangements – Enjoy a single room all to yourself at a small price

v Optional extensions to Hong Kong or other cities in China are always possible at great value

2013 Early Booking Discount
$500 off per person by Oct 31, 2012
MORE ON CHINA
Climate

China's climate can be compared to that of the United States in that there are four seasons, a primarily temperate climate, and conditions that vary widely from region to region.

North-Central China (Beijing, Xian) is similar in climate to Nebraska and Kansas, with less snow and rain during the winter. Late winter and early spring bring regular dust storms and haze.
South-Central China (Shanghai, Guangzhou) is comparable to the Gulf Coast states, though winter storms do not occur as often. Summer is hot and humid with frequent rain. Winter is shorter, cooler, and often overcast with drizzle.
Northeast China (Shenyang, Harbin) is similar to Minnesota. Summer is hot and dry, and winter is long and very cold.
Xinjiang (Urumqi, Turpan) experiences severe climate conditions with dramatic daily temperature swings. Summer can get very hot during the day, but generally cools off at night. Similarly, winter temperatures warm up during the day but plummet at night.
Tibet (Lhasa, Shigatse) also sees marked changes. When the sun shines, temperatures reach the mid-80s in the summer and the mid-60s in the winter. At night or when it rains or snows, temperatures drop significantly. Precipitation is minimal in the winter; summer showers are more common but occur mainly at night.

Average Temperatures of Major Cities in China

City
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Beijing
28
32
40
56
69
76
79
76
67
55
39
36
Chongqing
45
50
58
67
73
80
85
90
80
70
60
51
Dali
46
49
55
60
65
67
67
68
66
62
54
48
Guangzhou
58
60
64
71
78
81
83
83
81
75
67
57
Guilin
47
48
56
65
74
79
83
82
78
69
59
50
Hangzhou
39
41
48
60
69
75
83
83
75
64
54
43
Hong Kong
60
61
65
72
79
82
84
83
82
77
71
64
Jiuzhaigou
42
45
53
62
70
74
77
77
70
62
53
45
Lhasa
29
34
41
46
54
60
61
60
57
48
39
32
Lijiang
49
54
61
66
70
70
73
72
67
62
55
49
Kunming
50
52
56
62
67
67
68
67
64
59
53
50
Nanjing
35
38
47
59
68
76
83
82
73
62
51
39
Shanghai
40
42
47
57
66
74
82
82
75
64
55
42
Suzhou
38
40
48
58
67
74
83
83
74
64
54
43
Urumqi
5
10
32
50
66
74
78
74
64
47
28
10
Wuhan
37
41
50
61
70
78
84
83
74
64
52
42
Xian
32
38
50
56
72
80
78
76
60
52
40
30
Zhangjiajie
33
34
42
53
61
67
74
72
64
57
48
38

 
Language

China has 28 provinces and 28 major dialects; the official language being Mandarin, based on the Beijing dialect. Cantonese is a very common dialect in the south and remains as one of the official languages in Hong Kong and Macau (English and Portuguese respectively being the other official language).

There are currently two systems of written Chinese characters: The traditional and the simplified forms. The traditional form is still taught and used in Hong Kong and Macau. The simplified form was developed by the People's Republic of China in 1954 to promote mass literacy, simplifying complex traditional characters to fewer strokes. This form is used throughout mainland China. A well-educated Chinese today can read approximately 6000 characters. To be able to read a Chinese newspaper, one would have to read approximately 3000 characters.

 
National Holidays and Festivals

National Holidays:
January 1 - New Year
May 1 - Labor Day
October 1 - National Day

National Festivals:
1st day of the 1st lunar month - Chinese Lunar New Year & Spring Festival
5th solar term (April 4th, 5th, or 6th) - Qing Ming Festival (Ancestors Day)
5th day of the 5th lunar month - Dragon Boat Festival
15th day of the 8th lunar month - Mid Autumn Festival (Moon Festival)

 
Money

The official currency is the renminbi (RMB). The base unit of this currency is the yuan (CNY) and is colloquially called kuai. The subdivision is the jiao (at 10 jiao per yuan) and is colloquially called mao. The exchange rate as of Feb 2010 is 6.8 yuan to US$1. Note that "," is used in place of a "." so a price like ?3,7 is 3 kuai 7 mau.

Bring small denominations of US cash with you wherever you go to avoid problems with changing larger denominations and counterfeit notes, which is a major problem so be attentive with the notes you receive. It is not considered impolite to refuse a bill or to ask to have them changed.

You will get the best rates when exchanging your money before arriving in China.

Bargaining is normal and the vendors will engage in a hard bargain. It is fine to offer an absurdly lower price than the asking price and then find a price both you and the vendor are comfortable with.

In general, tipping is not expected but is always appreciated. However, it is customary to tip tour guides, tour bus drivers, and hotel bellhops as they do expect a tip for their service.

 
Electrical Requirements

220V/50Hz; US/European plug for 2-pin, Australian plug for 3-pin